Monday, October 24, 2011

Celebrate Authorship: Sequim : Events : North Olympic Library System (NOLS)

Monthly Celebrate Authorship series kicks off at Sequim Library

The Sequim Library begins a new monthly series entitled “Celebrate Authorship” on Saturday, October 22 at 1pm. Published author Georgia McDade, Ph.D. and a panel of local writers will speak about the Peaks and Pitfalls of Writing. In addition to reading from and speaking about their works, the panelists will answer questions from the audience.


Keynote speaker Georgia McDade, Ph.D. is a retired college instructor who facilitates a variety of workshops in addition to spending a large part of her time writing and editing. Although literature is her love, especially Shakespeare, she has been called “the Michael Jordan of English teachers” and “the Outline Queen” as a result of her students’ successes. In addition to her more than thirty years at Tacoma Community College, she has been on the faculties of Lakeside School, Zion Preparatory, Renton Vocational School, Seattle Central Community College, Seattle University, and the University of Washington. McDade writes in a variety of genres. Her first book, Travel Tips for Dream Trips, is about her six-month solo trip around the world. In 2009, her book of poetry, Outside the Cave, made its debut.

A panel of local writers will also read from and talk about their work. Lois Kennedy, whose writing journey began after studying with Georgia McDade, has published poetry and written biography and magazine articles. Bill Chisham writes fiction, technical books, and a number of mystery plays which have been presented locally at the Readers’ Theater. Wylie Walthall is a retired community college teacher with several published books; the most recent is Clandestine Entry and Other Stories. Matthew Stone is writing a young adult sci-fi novel that can be read online.

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Other names for FLASH or "hint" fiction:

Other names for FLASH or "hint" fiction: adumbration, advice, allusion, announcement, clue, communication, connotation, denotation, evidence, flea in ear, glimmering, help, idea, implication, impression, inference, information, inkling, innuendo, insinuation, intimation, iota, lead, mention, notice, notion, observation, omen, pointer, print, reference, reminder, scent, sign, signification, smattering, suspicion, symptom, taste, telltale, tinge, tip, tip-off, token, trace, warning, whiff, whisper, wink, word to wise, wrinkle. I declare these names as alternative names for flash/hint fiction, dated: 20 October, 2011

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

“Certain Poems Need To Be Released From Their Cages*

“Certain Poems Need To Be Released From Their Cages*

-Robert Bly

I took from my book of seeds and crumbs,
stopped what I was doing,
got still, and breathed
like I do when I hear a noise
outside my room at night.

I listened to my poem. It told me to stop expecting,
stop thinking
and just be there.

The poem peeked out at me again and said
I want to say to you
what the wind says to you
and what the warm breezes say.
Now, listen.

I stopped chasing the poem.
I let the poem catch me.
I let the poem hold me for a moment,
then it let me go.
.

"Certain Poems Need to Be Released from Their Cages", accepted by National Gallery of Writing Contribution, Oct., 2010 See: http://galleryofwriting.org/writing/2438796

Sunday, October 9, 2011

Two, 100 Word Stories, pub., 9 October

She had a beautiful set of mustaches. Many considered her facial d├ęcor off-putting, but she had such gorgeous features and long, auburn hair. When she was a teen, she used peroxide to hide the black hairs that had just begun to peek out of her upper lip. One day, in her haste to catch the school bus, she used too much peroxide and burned her lip. She vowed that she would never do it again, and in spite of what her parents and teachers said, she groomed her beautiful mustaches, combed them and waxed them. The boys were envious.

##

The mustache was very unhappy. Hosted on the grisly face of a man that submerged it in a mug of warm beer on so many occasions, and suffering the indignity of ignored, crusty secretions that were so common during the cold, winter months. Worse, the hours following a bout of vigorous lovemaking with his obese girlfriend. The mustache vowed to do something to escape captivity. Each morning, when the mustached man awoke, he discovered his mustache growing, and growing thicker and darker on a different part of his face. Sometimes, under his lip, sometimes in the middle of his forehead.

Monday, October 3, 2011

BE CAREFUL, FRIEND, JUST HOW YOU WIELD YOUR WIT

BE CAREFUL, FRIEND, JUST HOW YOU WIELD YOUR WIT
By Alice Workman - www.AskAuntAlice.net



Be careful, friend, just how you wield your wit.

For like the random swinging of a bat,

You may regret the outcome that you get.



Your strike may fling another in a pit,

The ricochet might also knock you flat.

Be careful, friend, just how you wield your wit.


You might amuse some on the face of it,

But secretly they’re filling up the vat;

You may regret the boiling that you get.



Annoy a mad dog, and you will get bit,

The same if you imply a woman's fat.

Be careful, friend, just how you wield your wit



The words you fling in jest may be a hit,

But like the tail-hold swinging of a cat,

You may regret the clawing that you get.



Though some may think you funny, I'll admit,

Still others will believe that you're a rat.

Be careful, friend, just how you wield your wit.

You may regret the outcome that you get.



Be careful, friend, just how you wield your wit.

For like the random swinging of a bat,

You may regret the outcome that you get.



Your strike may fling another in a pit,

The ricochet might also knock you flat.

Be careful, friend, just how you wield your wit.


You might amuse some on the face of it,

But secretly they’re filling up the vat;

You may regret the boiling that you get.



Annoy a mad dog, and you will get bit,

The same if you imply a woman's fat.

Be careful, friend, just how you wield your wit



The words you fling in jest may be a hit,

But like the tail-hold swinging of a cat,

You may regret the clawing that you get.



Though some may think you funny, I'll admit,

Still others will believe that you're a rat.

Be careful, friend, just how you wield your wit.

You may regret the outcome that you get.

First Mondays with Aubrey Hirsch: Fighting Title Block « Flash Fiction Chronicles

First Mondays with Aubrey Hirsch: Fighting Title Block « Flash Fiction Chronicles

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Saturday, October 1, 2011

My Haiku and subsequent "reviews". Awkward, to say the least.


The Haiku, in question:

This Spring, the barn burned
I now have a better view
of the blue mountains.


Also, after you click on the image, you will have to use your browser to make it larger.